Flying Star Feng Shui Case Studies (3) – Health Matters [Master Class 31]

It’s another week, we are back to the Feng Shui Master Class.  In the last two lessons, we have gone through five cases related to wealth and fame/job promotion.  After reading these cases, you should have realized that Feng Shui is much more than memorizing the rules.  You really need to match the external environment, interior layout and the status/need of the client to come up with a tailor-made solution.  There is really no such thing as universal Feng Shui setting that is applicable to all buildings.

This week, we’ll come back to a very commonly sought for Feng Shui goal, health.  We shall read two cases that illustrate how Feng Shui could affect the health of the occupants.  Although you probably would not live in a house with exactly the same situation, you would definitely be able to learn some ass-kicking Feng Shui techniques from these cases.

Feng Shui for Health

 

Case (1) – Double Sickness Star and Double Stars to Water

This is a typical case of how wealth and health may not co-exist in some Feng Shui cases.  The subject house was owned by an entrepreneur in Hong Kong whose last name is Ho.  The house was built in 2006, which was during the Eighth Period.  It was a detached house of three storeys, the whole house was owned by him and occupied by his family.

Below is the Flying Star Map of Mr. Ho’s house:

Health Flying Star Feng Shui Case 1

Let me first explain the external environment.  The house’s entrance door opens into West.  In front of the door was a garden with a large fish pond.  Mr. Ho loved keeping Koi (a kind of ornamental fish which is very expensive and popular in Japan and China).  There were eight fishes in that pond.

Mr. Ho has a son who was 16 years old when the Feng Shui analysis was done.  He lived in the Southeast corner on the first floor.  He loved this room because the windows open into Southeast for plenty of sunshine and cool wind.  (In Hong Kong, from micro-climate point of view the best direction to face is South because it is where the winds comes in Summer while the sun light would be adequate while not too much.  In winter, such orientation is also good because the cold wind comes from North, having no windows facing North helps to retain warmth in the room.)

Mr. Ho’s bedroom was located on the second floor of the house in the Northern corner.  The head of the bed was in North and the tail of the bed was pointing towards South.  He said that the fish pond and the orientation of the bed was suggested by a Feng Shui master.  The fish pond was designed for bringing wealth, while the bed should face South to resemble the orientation of the palace of ancient Chinese Emperors, so as to strengthen his power in the company he found.

Dear Master Class member, do you see any problem in the Feng Shui design?  Do you agree with the Feng Shui master that fish pond and bed orientation could help to achieve the goals?

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