Feng Shui Myths (3): Bad Marriage, Bad Relationship

Over the years, I have heard so many rumours about how bad Feng Shui at home could cause bad relationship.  These rumours sound very reliable because they are usually supported by Feng Shui theories that seem to be correct.  In this article, I am going to explain whether these rumours are correct or not.

 

Feng Shui Myth 1: Wall Cracks = Bad Marriage?

A very commonly heard Feng Shui myth is that if you found cracks on the walls of your house, your marriage would be bad.  The advocates of this theory suggest that since cracks mean breakage and separation, more cracks at home means higher chance of divorce.

Feng Shui Myths - Wall Cracks

This is absolutely wrong.

If you know a little bit of home decoration, you would know that the plastering on wall is prone to cracks due to natural shrinkage.  And if your house is more than 10 years old, most probably there would be one or two cracks on the wall, not to mention those on the ceiling and floor.  Basically, it is impossible to find a house without any cracks.

So cracks by themselves would not cause bad marriage.  But if the cracks are the result of defects in the building structure, say ground settlement, the defect itself may cause Feng Shui problems.  And certainly, even if you don’t believe in Feng Shui, you would not want to live in a house with structural problems, right?

 

Feng Shui Myth 2: Bad Kitchen Design Brings Two Wives?

Traditionally we believe the Feng Shui of the kitchen affects the housewife of a family.  This is why many Feng Shui myths related to bad marriage concern the kitchen design.

A very common Feng Shui rumour is that if there are two stoves the husband may have an affair with someone else, because the stove means the housewife, and if there are two stoves there would be two housewives in this family, meaning that the husband would fall in love with someone else.

Feng Shui Myths: Feng Shui Kitchen

A similar rumour is that if there are mirrors in the kitchen, when the housewife works in the kitchen the mirror would produce a duplicated image of the housewife.  There would, again, mean that there are more than one housewives in this family.

You may also have heard of that if there are two refrigerators in a kitchen, the chance of the husband having an affair would be high.  Basically, all these rumours are supported by a fundamental belief, that there should be only one kitchen and everything in the kitchen should be the only set in that kitchen.  Following this principle, you may even say that there should not be two ovens or wash basins in a kitchen.

These are all nonsense.

Firstly, it is not uncommon to have two housewives in a house.  If there are three generations living in the same house, it is just normal to have two or three housewives under the same roof!  And you can tell by common sense that, unless you live alone there are usually more than one stoves in your kitchen!  Don’t believe in these bullshxt theories!

 

Feng Shui Myth 3: Ivy Causes Bad Marriage

Some people believe that ivy, or hedera, hedera helix, etc., planted inside a house may cause bad marriage.  The idea behind may be that ivy is a climbing plant that is attached to a base structure, so it carries the meaning of having a third person clinging to a family member’s marriage.  And the stems of ivy is not straight but curved, so it may mean hiccups in a marriage.

Again, this myth is totally wrong.  In contrast, ivy is a good Feng Shui plant that may bring wealth if used properly.  While analogy is widely used in Feng Shui, it does not mean that you can arbitrarily make a conclusion simply because the shape of something looks like something else.

 

To conclude, Feng Shui has an effect on relationship and marriage but it is not the only factor.  The key to a successful marriage is the efforts that the couple made to maintain a good relationship.  If the love is real, it is unlikely that a plant or two stoves at home could cause any damage.

Feng Shui Myths (2): Water Fountain, Wealth Fog and the like

In the last article in this Feng Shui Myths series, we have discussed the use of lucky color to boost luck.  This time, we shall examine another popular topic in Feng Shui, i.e. the use of Feng Shui products.  Do you really believe that these stuff could bring better energy?

Most of the time when you seek help from a Feng Shui master, he would suggest that you place some Feng Shui accessories at home or in the workplace.  There are a large variety of Feng Shui accessories used by Feng Shui practitioners, the most commonly used ones include water fountain (this one is extremely popular), water column, wealth ship, wealth fog, Ba Gua, Feng Shui coins and Wu Lou.  Let me explain their effects.

Water Fountain / Water Column

These two are perhaps the most commonly used Feng Shui accessories.  Whenever we talk about using Feng Shui to bring wealth, we inevitably talk about the use of a water feature.

The logic behind using water fountain / water column is that water represents wealth.  So once we identified the direction where the”wealth star” locates, we should place a water feature there to enhance the power of the “wealth star”.  Both water fountain and water column are features with running water, so they are considered bring a dynamic stream of wealth.

Feng Shui Myths - Feng Shui Water Fountain

Is this true?  Yes.  Water features, if placed correctly, could bring better luck in wealth growth.  According to the Five-element Theory, the “wealth star” has a “water” characteristic, so placing water in that star’s direction could strengthen the power of that star.

Continue reading “Feng Shui Myths (2): Water Fountain, Wealth Fog and the like”

Feng Shui Myths (1): Lucky Color of a Year?

Thank you for reading this article.  You may have noticed that the topic begins with “Feng Shui Myths”.  It is my new attempt to write a series of blog posts surrounding a common topic.  I have chosen the “Feng Shui Myths” theme because I found that there are many commonly discussed Feng Shui ideas that people usually assume to be correct without trying to verify them.  I want to use my blog as a platform to clarify these ideas.  You will find that some of them are correct while some are actually wrong.

I will begin this series with a frequently asked question.  Many, seriously many, people ask me what is the lucky color for a particular year.  Their questions are not what is “my luck color” in this year.  They simply ask for the lucky color of a particular year, a “universal Feng Shui color” that is lucky for everyone on earth.  For example, many people think that the 2014 Feng Shui color is green.  Do you know why?

Feng Shui Color for A Year

The common saying that the lucky color for a year is xxx originates from the Five-element Theory (五行理論 in Chinese) in Feng Shui (there are similar theories in other traditional theories of other societies such as India, the difference is just that the number of elements and the type of elements are different.).  According to this theory, there are five elements in this universe.  Everything belongs to anyone of the five elements.  They are “Wood”, “Fire”, “Earth”, “Metal” and “Water”.

In Chinese, there is a system to represent a year.  It comprises of two Chinese characters.  For example, 2014 is the year of 甲午 (Jia Wu Year).  The second character is directly related to the zodiac sign of the Year.  午 (Wu) is the Zodiac Horse.  The first character of 2014, 甲 (Jia), belongs to the “Wood” element.  This is why people say 2014 is a Year of the Wooden Horse.

Feng Shui Color - Five Elements

(Image via Wikipedia, CC Licence)

According to the Five-element Theory, there are “Generating Interactions” among the five elements.  Every element is generated by another element.  For example, “Wood” is generated by “Water”.  In this sense, “Water” is a good element for “Wood”.  For a “Wood” year, “Water” is a lucky color.

Besides, the element of the year is also good in that year.  Obviously, “Wood” is a good element for a “Wood” year.

Lucky Colors for 2014 Year of Horse

So, for 2014 Year of Wooden Horse, any color belonging to “Wood” or “Water” elements are lucky.  Green color, in any intensity, belongs to “Wood”.  This is the reason people say green is luck in 2014.

Feng Shui Color for Year of Wooden Horse

(Swedish Dala Horse, image via Wikipedia, CC Licence)

Why don’t we use “Water” colors?  In fact you can, but it is most powerful to use the color of the same element as the year, so green is preferred to blue.

The Use of Lucky Colors

Usually when people ask me what is the lucky color for that year, I would say that the luck color of the year is less important.  What really matters is your own personal color.

There are two reasons.  Firstly, to match the lucky color of each year means that you need to repaint the walls of your flat, buy a new car and replace all shirts before a new year begins.  It is impractical.  Secondly, your personal lucky color is more powerful.  It affects you for your entire life.  What bother to use the yearly lucky color if you already have a powerful personal lucky color?

I have previously written a post about Feng Shui color.  You only need to know your year of birth to find out your personal lucky color.  Check it out!

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